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Wind Energy On Track To Surpass Coal Power In Texas

01/13/2020 | Houston Public Media— New data from the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) shows power generated from wind nearly caught up to that from coal in 2019. Both now make up about 20% of the state’s energy mix, with wind just 0.3 percentage points below coal.

New York Won’t Appeal Its Defeat in Exxon Climate Trial

01/11/2020 | Yahoo! New York won’t appeal a ruling by a judge who rejected the state’s claim that Exxon Mobil Corp. misled investors for years about the oil giant’s internal planning for risks associated with climate change.

Students start early learning about gas and oil industry

01/8/2020 | WTOV9 FoxStudents at Corpus Christi School had a chance to learn all about the oil and gas industry Wednesday as the Mobile Oilfield Learning Unit was on site. It's a hands-on program that teaches kids about STEM and the different activities involved with the oil and gas industry, which is booming in the Ohio Valley right now.

Fracking ban could have unintended consequence of boosting coal

09/22/2019 | The Hill— A big environmental talking point this election season is a call to ban fracking. The argument is supported by the likes of Sens. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) and Kamala Harris (D-Calif.).

Saudi oil attacks didn't spark a U.S. fuel crisis. Thank Texas

09/16/2019 | Dallas Morning News Editorial— The world is not facing an oil crisis. Yes, half of Saudi Arabia’s daily production capacity was knocked out last week when facilities were damaged by airstrikes. Yes, if it takes many months for the Saudis to repair the facility, that could keep oil prices elevated.

Methane Emissions Continue to Drop

09/5/2019 | The Hill— In the oil and natural gas industry, you don’t get very far without making use of valuable resources rather than treating them as waste. So, it probably shouldn’t surprise you that methane emissions in the United States have dropped 15 percent since 1990 even as natural gas production increased more than 50 percent over that same period.

Policymakers Increasingly Intolerant of Acts Targeting Infrastructure

06/15/2019 | Midland Reporter Telegram— In recent years, we've watched as environmental activists have adopted more aggressive tactics designed to block the development of infrastructure projects that benefit our nation, at times even taking destructive and violent action to stop the construction of pipeline systems and other oil and gas facilities in the United States.

Environmentalists Say the Time to Act on Climate is Now. Voters Aren’t So Sure.

11/12/2018 | PEW— Although numerous left-leaning measures found success at the ballot box last week, many voters said “no thank you” to policies that could curb climate change. Washington state, for the second election cycle in a row, rejected putting a price on carbon emissions. Arizonans won’t require utilities to get half of their energy from renewable sources.

The Mid-Term Elections Were Generally Good for Oil and Gas

11/08/2108 | Forbes— As a general rule, a divided federal government is the best kind of federal government where the oil and gas industry is concerned. This is an industry that places a high degree of importance on regulatory and statutory certainty, and a divided government tends to result in a slower pace of change in these areas. The unified, Republican-controlled government of the past two years produced a rapid pace of change, though much of it has actually been favorable for the industry, as the Trump Administration has gone about revising and repealing a raft of Obama-era actions.

Voters Rejected Most Ballot Measures Aimed at Curbing Climate Change

11/7/2018 | The Washington Post— From Arizona to Colorado, voters reject measures to ramp up renewables and limit drilling. In Arizona, voters said no to accelerating the shift to renewable energy. In Colorado, they said no to an effort to sharply limit drilling on non-federal land. And a measure to make Washington the first state to tax carbon emissions appears to have fallen short.